中英环境中心:欧盟SEW-REAP框架项目博士后招聘启事

审核发布:资源环境学院 来源单位及审核人: 发布时间:2017-12-12浏览次数:841

Department of Resources & Environment

South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou
In association with the LEC-SCAU-GIG Joint Institute of the Environment

中英环境科学研究中心

(华南农业大学-英国兰卡斯特大学-中国科学院广州地球化学研究所)

2-year Post-doctoral Research Position

Funded byframework of the European Union’sSEW-REAP

(Addressing food Security, Environmental stress and Water by promoting multidisciplinary Research EAnd China Partnerships in science and business)

中国欧盟SEW-REAP框架项目:三个两年制博士后招聘

  

  

1、Soybean root ideotypes conferring tolerance to combined drought and low phosphorus stresses

耐干旱与低磷胁迫的大豆根型研究博士后

Supervisors:  Prof Ian Dodd (Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, UK)

Prof Jiang Tian (South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China)

田江教授  华南农业大学根系生物中心/资源环境学院植物营养系

 

Background: While China has had remarkable success in producing sufficient food for its large population, accelerated economic development has increased demand for meat and dairy products. Livestock weight gain is promoted by consumption of vegetable proteins, of which the best is soy meal. Although China is the centre of origin of soybean domestication, it imports substantial quantities of soy meal and there is a national drive to increase domestic production. Unless soy displaces cereals within crop rotations, this may require growing crops under suboptimal conditions of low water availability and/or phosphorus (P), particularly in the acidic soils of south China. Moreover, since over-use of P and irrigation water causes environmental problems, there is increasing pressure on farmers to limit their use of these finite and/or transiently scarce resources.

  

Plant root systems show morphological (e.g. increased root hair length and density, lateral root proliferation, tap root elongation), molecular and physiological (e.g. increased expression of phosphate transporter genes, exudation of phosphatase enzymes and organic acids) adaptations in response to low P stress. The Root Biology Group at South China Agricultural University (SCAU) has increased soybean tolerance to low P by identifying genetic diversity in soybean root traits, developing recombinant inbred line populations by crossing parental lines with divergent tolerance to low P stress, and by overexpressing phosphate starvation responsive genes under the control of root-specific or constitutive promoters (Yao et al., 2014a; b; Liu et al., 2016; Xue et al., 2017). Work continues to understand the relative costs and benefits of these approaches, in pyramiding traits to improve P acquisition.

  

Some of these traits improving P acquisition may have positive or negative impacts on plant tolerance to water deficits, since vertical gradients of phosphorus and water availability are often opposite in field soils. Thus shallow roots (which enhance access to the higher P concentrations in surface soil layers) may limit rooting depth, thus diminishing the crop’s ability to acquire water at depth in the soil profile. Moreover, a higher proportion of roots in the upper layers may increase root production of chemical signals such as ABA, that limits leaf gas exchange and leaf growth (Martin-Vertedor & Dodd, 2011). Alternatively, increased root hair length (which assists P acquisition from the soil) may enhance plant water uptake, although the relative importance of root hairs in water uptake is uncertain (Diatloff & Dodd, 2016). “Designer root systems” for low-phosphorus soils that also experience fluctuating water availability need to consider the relative costs and benefits of both P and water acquisition.

  

Plants roots adapt to their local environment by altering their phytohormone production, which can have local effects in the roots (eg. changes in hydraulic conductance) and can be exported from the roots to alter shoot physiology (eg. stomatal closure). Root-specific overexpression of phytohormone biosynthesis genes has increased crop yields of plants grown in saline soil (Albacete et al., 2015), but it is uncertain whether this approach can be more widely applied under other stresses.

  

Using the substantial genetic resources in soybean available at SCAU, you will:

§Identify variation in multiple root traits under individual and combined low P and drought stresses, and determine their genetic regulation

§Transform soybean with hormone biosynthesis genes to evaluate the impacts on water and P acquisition

§Conduct field experiments to evaluate the relative success of different approaches to increasing soybean tolerance to individual and combined low P and drought stresses

Join an exciting research environment. You will join the large and vibrant Root Biology Group at South China Agricultural University, while also being affiliated with the Plant Water Stress Research Group at the Lancaster Environment Centre. Research infrastructure and resources will be available for this project at the newly appointed ‘Joint Institute for the Environment’ (JIE) located in SCAU in Guangzhou, China – at which you will be primarily based – and within the Lancaster Environment Centre, UK. We envisage time split between the Chinese and UK organisations, though successful candidates will have to spend a minimum of 12 months in China before 1st April 2019.

Be part of the EU SEW-REAP research community. This post is one of three within the framework of the European Union’s SEW-REAP (Addressing food Security, Environmental stress and Water by promoting multidisciplinary Research EAnd China Partnerships in science and business) project which aims to provide solutions to the Agri-Food-Water-Environment Nexus within China, which will base 3 postdoctoral positions at SCAU. Additionally, SEW-REAP has already based 9 PhD-level researchers within China (most of whom are based at the JIE).

Who should apply: You should have a PhD no more than 3 years in Plant Sciences (e.g. molecular biology, biochemistry or physiology) with an interest in crop phenotyping. You must have proven capacity for creative, high-quality research, evidenced by your publication record, which must be commensurate with the opportunities provided. Your age should be not above 35.

Due to the nature of funding (postdoctoral salary in China which is supplemented by a contribution from the EU SEW-REAP project), only UK / European citizens are eligible to apply.

A willingness to embrace new research challenges while living in China for at least 1 of the 2 years is essential.

Funding: The PDRA will be an employee of the South China Agricultural University (SCAU). A 2-year post-doctoral research assistant (PDRA) salary (equivalent to €17,805 per annum at today’s rates) will be paid by SCAU and supplemented with RMB 1500 (€190) per month for accommodation costs in China. Income from SCAU will be taxed and paid in China. 12 months living and travel expenses are also available from the SEW-REAP programme, at a rate of €1680 free of tax per calendar month spent in China. Together, the combined funding for this post is approximately €27,885 p.a. averaged across the two years.

Deadline for applications:  [31st January 2018]

Provisional Interview Date (by Skype if necessary): [10th February 2018]

Start Date: 1 April 2018

  

For further information or informal discussion about the position, please contact Prof Ian Dodd (i.dodd@lancaster.ac.uk) or Prof Jiang Tian (jtian@scau.edu.cn).

Application process: Due to the limited time between the closing date and the interview date, it is essential that you ensure references are submitted by the closing date or as soon as possible.

Further reading

A Albacete, C Martínez-Andújar, A Martínez-Pérez, AJ Thompson, IC Dodd, F Pérez-Alfocea (2015) Unravelling rootstock x scion interactions to improve food security. Journal ofExperimental Botany 66, 2211-2226.

IC Dodd, E Diatloff (2016) Enhanced root growth of the brb (bald root barley) mutant in drying soil allows similar shoot physiological responses to soil water deficit as wild-type plants. Functional Plant Biology 43, 199-206.

AI Martin-Vertedor, IC Dodd (2011) Root-to-shoot signalling when soil moisture is heterogeneous: increasing the proportion of root biomass in drying soil inhibits leaf growth and increases leaf ABA concentration. Plant, Cell and Environment 34, 1164-1175.

Xue Y, Xiao B, Zhu S, Mo X, Liang C, Tian J*, Liao H (2017) GmPHR25, a phosphate starvation up-regulated GmPHR member controls phosphate homeostasis in soybean. Journal of Experimental Botany. doi:10.1093/jxb/erx292

Liu P, Xue YB, Chen ZJ, Liu GD*, Tian J* (2016) Characterization of purple acid phosphatases involved in extracellular dNTP utilization in StylosanthesJournal of Experimental Botany 67,4141-4154.

Yao Z, Tian J*, Liao H (2014a) Comparative characterization of GmSPX members reveals that GmSPX3 is involved in phosphate homeostasis in soybean. Annals of Botany114,477-488.

Yao Z, Liang CY, Zhang Q, Chen ZJ, Xiao BX, Tian J*, Liao H (2014b) SPX1 is an important component in the phosphorus signalling network of common bean regulating root growth and phosphorus homeostasis. Journal of Experimental Botany 65,3299-3310

 

 

2、Organic contaminants in agro-ecosystems

农田有机污染生态学研究博士后

Supervisors:Prof Kevin Jones and Prof Hao Zhang (Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, UK)

Prof Yongtao Li (South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China)

李永涛教授  华南农业大学资源环境学院

Prof Gan Zhang (Guangdong Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

张干研究员  中国科学院广州地球化学研究所

  

Background: China has done a great deal to improve the productivity and security of its food supply.  However, there have also been concerns in recent years about food quality, caused by unwanted residues in key food products. Chemical residues can enter our food chain as a result of deliberate use (e.g. antibiotics in animals/aquaculture; drugs used in livestock etc.), or as pesticides or through wastes applied to agricultural land. There is much public concern and media attention on this topic, and a need to bring strong and objective science to assess the extent and significance of this topic in China. Should we be concerned by the use and occurrence of organic chemicals in Chinese foodstuffs, or do the benefits of improved food production greatly outweigh potential risks?  If there are concerns, where should improved management, training and regulation be targeted? How can we achieve improvements in food quality?

  

The UK and Chinese team involved here bring together expertise in the measurement, modelling and understanding of contaminants in the environment. We have strong links to regulators, environment and agricultural ministries, industries and academic groups.

  

In this project, we will take a holistic view of the organic chemicals in Chinese agro-ecosystems and try to assess the extent and scale of the problem. We can collate data on the supply/use/entry of chemicals into food chains, and assess the priorities and risks using Chinese databases, screening and modelling tools. Through wider collaborations, we will have access to field experimental plots and data, to assess the levels, persistence, transfer and significance of contaminants reaching agro-ecosystems and the key foods products.  We have first-rate laboratories (excellent LC-MS; GC-MS facilities), to make our own measurements and experiments. These may target studies on the form and fate of contaminants in terrestrial or aquatic food chains, using techniques that can characterise the labile and bioavailable fraction of chemicals in agro-ecosystems.

  

We are looking to recruit a PDRA with a commitment and interest in improving our understanding and management of food/environmental quality. We want someone who will take ownership of a project and develop their expertise and leadership. The topic is deliberately written quite openly, as it can be developed in different directions.

  

Join an exciting research environment. You will join the large and vibrant group at South China Agricultural University (SCAU) and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIG), while also being affiliated with the Biogeochemistry Research Group at the Lancaster Environment Centre. Research infrastructure and resources will be available for this project at the newly appointed ‘Joint Institute for the Environment’ (JIE) located in SCAU in Guangzhou, China – at which you will be primarily based – and within the Lancaster Environment Centre, UK. We envisage time split between the Chinese and UK organisations, though successful candidates will have to spend a minimum of 12 months in China before 1st April 2019.

  

Be part of the EU SEW-REAP research community. This post is one of three within the framework of the European Union’s SEW-REAP (Addressing food Security, Environmental stress and Water by promoting multidisciplinary Research EAnd China Partnerships in science and business) project which aims to provide solutions to the Agri-Food-Water-Environment Nexus within China, which will base 3 postdoctoral positions at SCAU. Additionally, SEW-REAP has already based 9 PhD-level researchers within China (most of which are based at the JIE).

Who should apply: You should have a PhD no more than 3 years in Environmental Chemistry/Sciences, with an interest in chemicals management and environmental health. Ideally you will have expertise with trace organics analysis – by LC-MS/GC-MS for trace analysis – and/or expertise in chemical fate modelling. You must have proven capacity for creative, high-quality research, evidenced by your publication record. Ability to lead and co-ordinate independent research and a work autonomously.Your age should be not above 35.

You should have experiences in either: (a) advanced geochemical laboratory analysis; (b) the transport and biotransformation of emergent organic contaminants (e.g., steroid hormones) in agro-ecosystems (lab work); (c) the development of passive sampling based methods (ideally DGT) for quantifying emergent organic contaminants in the environment; or (d) modelling the field-scale transport of contaminants.

Due to the nature of funding (postdoctoral salary in China which is supplemented by a contribution from the EU SEW-REAP project), only UK / European citizens are eligible to apply.

A willingness to embrace new research challenges while living in China for at least 1 of the 2 years is essential.

Funding: The PDRA will be an employee of the South China Agricultural University (SCAU). A 2-year post-doctoral research assistant (PDRA) salary (equivalent to €17,805 per annum at today’s rates) will be paid by SCAU and supplemented with RMB 1500 (€190) per month for accommodation costs in China. Income from SCAU will be taxed and paid in China. 12 months living and travel expenses are also available from the SEW-REAP programme, at a rate of €1680 free of tax per calendar month spent in China. Together, the combined funding for this post is approximately €27,885 p.a. averaged across the two years.

Deadline for applications:  [31st January 2018]

Provisional Interview Date (by Skype if necessary): [6th February 2018]

Start Date: 1 April 2018

For further information or informal discussion about the position, please contact Prof Kevin Jones (k.c.jones@lancaster.ac.uk)

Application process: Due to the limited time between the closing date and the interview date, it is essential that you ensure references are submitted by the closing date or as soon as possible.

  

  

 

3、Soil Ecology – Carbon sequestration in Chinese grassland soils

土壤生态学-碳循环研究博士后

Supervisors:   Prof Nick Ostle (Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, UK)

Profs Yongtao Li and Chunling Luo (South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China)李永涛教授、罗春玲教授  华南农业大学资源环境学院

Prof Gan Zhang (Guangdong Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

张干研究员  中国科学院广州地球化学研究所

 

Background: Grasslands cover 40% of the earth’s land surface, with the largest areas being found in Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. These grasslands support human livelihoods with food, fuel and fibre, and play a vital role in climate and water regulation, and influence global biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, across the world, grasslands are of crucial importance for social cohesion, supporting traditional farming communities, cultures and wider populations. Nonetheless, estimates suggest that over 50% of the earth’s grasslands are degraded, due largely to over-grazing and inappropriate management, with climate change accentuating the problem. This has far-reaching socio-economic consequences, affecting poverty, and creating major environmental problems at local, regional and global scales, such as reduced carbon and water quality, and accelerated soil erosion. Given this, it is all the more surprising that understanding of the causes of grassland degradation remains limited, resulting in a staggering paucity of science-based policies for their restoration. To make matters worse, knowledge of the factors that make grasslands resilient to climate change, or other perturbations such as fire and flood, is severely constrained. There is now an urgent need to improve scientific understanding to underpin policy, decisions and management practice that ensure the sustainability of global grasslands.

  

In China, grasslands occupy more that 30% of the land surface with growing evidence of damage and degradation due to over-exploitation and climate change. In some regions the degradation of grasslands has led to ecosystem collapse, soil erosion and even desertification (e.g. Qinghai plateau and Inner Mongolia). This has effectively removed large areas of valuable land from the food production system with critical consequences for dependent communities. One key to the sustainability and function of grasslands is soil organic carbon. The capacity of any grassland ecosystem to capture and sequester carbon below ground is an important natural ecosystem service that contributes to the mitigation of fossil fuel derived greenhouse gas emissions. In this way, grasslands ‘mop up’ atmospheric CO2 through photosynthesis and input organic matter into the ground as decaying matter or live root exudates. These inputs feed a voracious heterotrophic community that together regulate soil carbon sequestration and total ecosystem carbon stocks.

  

Science Uncertainty: Changes in land use and management coupled with ongoing climate warming and shifts in hydrological regimes are now strongly influencing this key grassland function. Evidence from other ecosystems indicate that interactions between management and climate factors can be important. Specifically, the effects of changes in grazing intensity and climate on the form and quantity of soil carbon stocks remain limited particularly across Asia constraining understanding on the regulators of soil carbon sequestration across the region and, consequently, the provision of innovations for soil security and grassland restoration.

  

Research questions: In this research project, we will be asking:

1.How have intensive management and climate change affected Chinese grassland soil carbon stocks?

2.How resilient are Chinese grassland soil carbon stocks to future perturbation including climate change?

3.How do the management and climate induced change in soil carbon stocks influence CH4 and N2O emissions?

  

The science: Research will involve joining with UK and Chinese scientists at Lancaster University and the South China Agricultural University (SCAU) to design sampling surveys, collect samples, prepare materials for analyses, analyse data and lead publications for peer reviewed journals. Advantage will be taken of existing grassland soil archives in China and newly sampled materials from across Chinese grassland ecosystems and climatic gradients. A combination of novel techniques will be used, including soil organic matter analyses (fractionation and chemistry), biotic assays (plant and microbial biomarkers, enzymology and greenhouse gas emissions), isotopic measurements (13C and 14C) as well as standard soil physico-chemical metrics (macro- and micro- aggregates). The role will complement projects with sample regimes across Inner Mongolia and the Tibetan-Qinghai plateau linking with UK GCRF PDRAs on projects held by Prof Ostle and Profs Li and Zhang.

  

Join an exciting research environment. You will join the large and vibrant Environmental Isotope and Soil Function Group at South China Agricultural University, while also being affiliated with the Soil, Plant and Land Systems Research Group at the Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) and the CAS Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry (GIG). The PDRA researcher and project will be jointly supervised by Prof Nick Ostle (LEC), Profs Li and Luo (SCAU) and Prof Zhang (GIG). Research infrastructure and resources will be available for this project at the newly appointed ‘Joint Institute for the Environment’ (JIE) located in SCAU in Guangzhou, China – at which you will be primarily based – and within the Lancaster Environment Centre, UK. We envisage time split between the Chinese and UK organisations, though successful candidates will have to spend a minimum of 12 months in China before 1st April 2019.

  

Be part of the EU SEW-REAP research community. This post is one of three within the framework of the European Union’s SEW-REAP (Addressing food Security, Environmental stress and Water by promoting multidisciplinary Research EAnd China Partnerships in science and business) project which aims to provide solutions to the Agri-Food-Water-Environment Nexus within China, which will base 3 postdoctoral positions at SCAU. Additionally, SEW-REAP has already based 9 PhD-level researchers within China (most of whom are based at the JIE).

Who should apply:  You should have a PhD no more than 3 years in Biological, Environmental or Ecological Sciences with experience of soil research, an interest in organic matter chemistry and strong statistical skills. You must have proven capacity for creative, high-quality research, evidenced by your publication record. Ability to lead and co-ordinate independent research and a work autonomously. Your age should be not above 35.

Due to the nature of funding (postdoctoral salary in China which is supplemented by a contribution from the EU SEW-REAP project), only UK / European citizens are eligible to apply. A willingness to embrace new research challenges while living in China for at least 1 of the 2 years is essential.

Funding: The PDRA will be an employee of the South China Agricultural University (SCAU). A 2-year post-doctoral research assistant (PDRA) salary (equivalent to €17,805 per annum at today’s rates) will be paid by SCAU and supplemented with RMB 1500 (€190) per month for accommodation costs in China. Income from SCAU will be taxed and paid in China. 12 months living and travel expenses are also available from the SEW-REAP programme, at a rate of €1680 free of tax per calendar month spent in China. Together, the combined funding for this post is approximately €27,885 p.a. averaged across the two years.

Deadline for applications:  [31st January 2018]

Provisional Interview Date (by Skype if necessary): [6th February 2018]

Start Date: 1 April 2018

For further information or informal discussion about the position, please contact Prof Nick Ostle (n.ostle@lancaster.ac.uk)

Application process: Due to the limited time between the closing date and the interview date, it is essential that you ensure references are submitted by the closing date or as soon as possible.

Further reading

§Jiang, L., Song, M., Yang, L., Zhang, D., Sun, Y., Shen, Z., Luo C., Zhang, G. (2016). Exploring the Influence of Environmental Factors on Bacterial Communities within the Rhizosphere of the Cu-tolerant plant, Elsholtzia splendens. Scientific reports, 6, 36302.

§Zong, Z., Wang, X., Tian, C., Chen, Y., Fang, Y., Zhang, F., … & Zhang, G. (2017). First assessment of NOx sources at a regional background site in North China using isotopic analysis linked with modeling. Environmental Science & Technology.

§Li, Y. T., Rouland, C., Benedetti, M., Li, F. B., Pando, A., Lavelle, P., & Dai, J. (2009). Microbial biomass, enzyme and mineralization activity in relation to soil organic C, N and P turnover influenced by acid metal stress. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 41(5), 969-977.

§Lin, Z., Zhen, Z., Wu, Z., Yang, J., Zhong, L., Hu, H., … & Zhang, D. (2016). The impact on the soil microbial community and enzyme activity of two earthworm species during the bioremediation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated soils. Journal of Hazardous mMaterials, 301, 35-45.

§Li, X., Lin, Z., Luo, C., Bai, J., Sun, Y., & Li, Y. (2015). Enhanced microbial degradation of pentachlorophenol from soil in the presence of earthworms: Evidence of functional bacteria using DNA-stable isotope probing. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 81, 168-177.

§Zhang, Y., Kaiser, K., Li, L., Zhang, D., Ran, Y., & Benner, R. (2014). Sources, distributions, and early diagenesis of sedimentary organic matter in the Pearl River region of the South China Sea. Marine Chemistry, 158, 39-48.

§Xu, H. J., Wang, X. H., Li, H., Yao, H. Y., Su, J. Q., & Zhu, Y. G. (2014). Biochar impacts soil microbial community composition and nitrogen cycling in an acidic soil planted with rape. Environmental science & technology, 48(16), 9391-9399.

§Zhang, Y., Wang, L., Li, W., Xu, H., Shi, Y., Sun, Y., … & Li, Y. (2017). Earthworms and phosphate-solubilizing bacteria enhance carbon accumulation in manure-amended soils. Journal of Soils and Sediments, 17(1), 220-228.

§Broadbent, A.A.D., Orwin, K.H., Peltzer, D.A., Dickie, I., Mason, N.W.H., Ostle, N.J., Stevens, C.J. (2017). Invasive N-fixer impacts on litter decomposition driven by changes to soil properties not litter qualityEcosystems. p. 1-13. 13 p.

§McCormack, C.G., Ostle, N.J. (2016) Key impacts of climate engineering on biodiversity and ecosystems, with priorities for future researchJournal of Integrative Environmental Sciences. 13, 2-4, p. 103-128.

§Baxendale, C.L., Ostle, N.J., Wood, C.M., Oakley, S., Ward, S.E. (2016) Can digital image classification be used as a standardised method for surveying peatland vegetation cover?Ecological Indicators. 68, p. 150-156.

§Armstrong, A.B., Ostle, N.J., Whitaker, J. (2016) Solar park microclimate and vegetation management effects on grassland carbon cyclingEnvironmental Research Letters. 11, 7, 11 p.

§McKenzie, S.W., Johnson, S.N., Jones, T.H., Ostle, N.J., Hails, R.S., Vanbergen, A.J. (2016) Root herbivores drive changes to plant primary chemistry, but root loss is mitigated under elevated atmospheric CO2Frontiers in Plant Science. 7.

§Hill, R., Saetnan, E.R., Scullion, J., Gwynn-Jones, D., Ostle, N.J. (2016) Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure. Environmental Microbiology 18, 6, p. 1942-1953.

§Walker, T., Garnett, M.H., Ward, S.E., Oakley, S., Bardgett, R., Ostle, N.J. (2016) Vascular plants promote ancient peatland carbon loss with climate warmingGlobal Change Biology. 22, 5, p. 1880-1889.

  

 

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